How To Protect Your Home’s Interior From Sun Damage

It’s hot out there! The sizzling summer sun can have lasting effects on your home’s interior as it beats down on furniture and décor throughout the day. Carpets, drapes, hardwood flooring, artwork, sofas, chairs and more that are exposed to direct sunlight are susceptible to sun damage such as fading, drying, and cracking. Fabrics and leather are strong, but UV rays are stronger, and can even shine through windows on cloudy or rainy days. As longer and hotter days approach, here are some tips for protecting your home’s interior from sun and heat damage:

Play musical chairs. Move things around so that any one item is not constantly soaking in direct sunlight. Switch similar furniture or art pieces between sunny and dark rooms a few times throughout the summer to reduce sun exposure.

Window tinting. No need to be completely in the dark—even the slightest shaded window film can significantly protect interior items from fading. Tinted windows still allow plenty of natural light in, while blocking harmful UV rays to significantly reduce heat and sun damage. Solar Control window films can also block up to 79% of incoming solar energy, reducing the amount of heat coming into your home and therefore saving you money on air conditioning bills.

Add protective layers. Just like we apply sunscreen to our skin, fabrics and upholsteries should be protected from the sun. Cover couches with blankets during the day, and coat outdoor furniture with protective sealants (check out what products are best for specific materials here).

Draw the shades. Before leaving the house, you should create as much shade as possible. Close blinds and drapes, which will sacrifice the sun’s heat to protect the rest of the interior space. Keep windows cracked to allow a breeze.

Communicate with your designer. When designing your interior space, we are here to help! Ask questions, create a flexible space that can be rotated during the peak of summer sunshine, and work together to organize furniture and décor with fading in mind.

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